Archive for the ‘South Carolina Specific’ Category

Small bites on visitation

Absent a showing of a “substantial change of circumstances” one is allowed to bring only one motion for temporary relief on a particular issue prior to trial. Typically these motions are brought early in the case–some attorneys almost reflexively file these motions with their initial pleading. However whatever relief the client obtains at the temporary […]

The problem in filing updated financial declarations at final hearings to approve agreements

Family Court Rule 20(a) requires “a current financial declaration” “be served and filed” “[i]n any domestic relations action in which the financial condition of a party is relevant or is an issue to be considered by the court.” A problem arises when parties negotiate an agreement involving financial issues while relying on old financial declarations, […]

“Hammered” by the family court, Court of Appeals hammers Husband again

There are some family court smack-downs that beg for an appeal. And there are some Court of Appeals decisions that beg for a petition for certiorari. The April 13, 2016 opinion in Fredrickson v. Schulze is one such case. Husband, Schulze, appealed many aspects of the family court’s equitable distribution decision along with its denial […]

Husband’s lack of credibility on financial disclosure has multiple adverse consequences

The March 16, 2016 Court of Appeals opinion in Conits v. Conits rejects many of Husband’s allegations of error in the family court’s equitable distribution award because he lacked credibility in his financial disclosure. This opinion is a warning to those who would provide false financial disclosure that this lack of credibility can be fatal […]

2015 may set record low in published family law opinions

2015 may set a record low in published South Carolina family law opinions. Counting a refiled opinion in Srivastava v. Srivastava, 411 S.C. 481, 769 S.E.2d 442 (Ct. App. 2015), that was originally filed in 2014, but not counting a dismissal of certiorari as improvidently granted in Hudson v. Hudson, 414 S.C. 352, 778 S.E.2d […]

The difficulties relocating with children merely because the stepparent is moving

Custodial parents rarely consider whether their spouses are prone to work related relocations when they decide to (re)marry. They simply assume that if their spouse moves they and the children will move. Rarely do they consider the difficulties they might encounter with the other parent if they wish to relocate merely because their own spouse […]

It just became a little easier (although still not very easy) to sue DSS in tort

There is a common complaint among attorneys who do appeals that they do not recognize the fact pattern described in their appellate decisions. The belief is that appellate courts sometimes start with the result they want to establish and then highlight facts that would justify that result and ignore or downplay facts that might lead […]

South Carolina Supreme Court leaves intact important Court of Appeals opinion on prenuptial agreements

I probably should have noted this when it came out, but on October 28, 2015 the South Carolina Supreme Court, in Hudson v. Hudson, 414 S.C. 352, 778 S.E.2d 482 (2015), dismissed as improvidently granted the writ of certiorari it issued to review the Court of Appeals opinion in Hudson v. Hudson, 408 S.C. 76, 757 […]