Archive for the ‘South Carolina Appellate Decisions’ Category

On the same day two separate Court of Appeals panels reverse transmutation findings

On July 13, 2016, the Court of Appeals published two opinions in which the primary issue on appeal was transmutation–the almost alchemical process by which non-marital property turns into marital property: Taylor-Cracraft v. Cracraft and McMillan v. McMillan. In both cases the Court of Appeals largely reverses the family courts’ transmutation findings. The timing of […]

Court of Appeals affirms contempt finding against mother who didn’t force children to visit

Calling bullsh*t on custodial parents who let the children decide their visitation is one of my most controversial and by far my most commented-upon blog.  In that blog I argue that it is the custodial parent’s job to require the children spend their court-ordered visitation time with the non-custodial parent (assuming that parent wants to […]

“Hammered” by the family court, Court of Appeals hammers Husband again

There are some family court smack-downs that beg for an appeal. And there are some Court of Appeals decisions that beg for a petition for certiorari. The April 13, 2016 opinion in Fredrickson v. Schulze is one such case. Husband, Schulze, appealed many aspects of the family court’s equitable distribution decision along with its denial […]

Husband’s lack of credibility on financial disclosure has multiple adverse consequences

The March 16, 2016 Court of Appeals opinion in Conits v. Conits rejects many of Husband’s allegations of error in the family court’s equitable distribution award because he lacked credibility in his financial disclosure. This opinion is a warning to those who would provide false financial disclosure that this lack of credibility can be fatal […]

2015 may set record low in published family law opinions

2015 may set a record low in published South Carolina family law opinions. Counting a refiled opinion in Srivastava v. Srivastava, 411 S.C. 481, 769 S.E.2d 442 (Ct. App. 2015), that was originally filed in 2014, but not counting a dismissal of certiorari as improvidently granted in Hudson v. Hudson, 414 S.C. 352, 778 S.E.2d […]

It just became a little easier (although still not very easy) to sue DSS in tort

There is a common complaint among attorneys who do appeals that they do not recognize the fact pattern described in their appellate decisions. The belief is that appellate courts sometimes start with the result they want to establish and then highlight facts that would justify that result and ignore or downplay facts that might lead […]

South Carolina Supreme Court leaves intact important Court of Appeals opinion on prenuptial agreements

I probably should have noted this when it came out, but on October 28, 2015 the South Carolina Supreme Court, in Hudson v. Hudson, 414 S.C. 352, 778 S.E.2d 482 (2015), dismissed as improvidently granted the writ of certiorari it issued to review the Court of Appeals opinion in Hudson v. Hudson, 408 S.C. 76, 757 […]

South Carolina Supreme Court distinguishes personal goodwill from enterprise goodwill for equitable distribution purposes

The October 7, 2015 Supreme Court opinion in Moore v. Moore , 779 S.E.2d 533 (S.C. 2015), is the first published South Carolina appellate opinion to distinguish personal goodwill from enterprise goodwill for equitable distribution purposes. As this is a frequently recurring issue, the Moore opinion is necessary reading for any family court attorney who handles equitable distributions cases […]