Keeping smart people from doing stupid stuff

Posted Friday, April 28th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

When I attended law school no one informed me that I would spend a substantial part of most days talking smart people out of doing

Giving it away

Posted Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

When I mentor newly licensed attorneys, one of the more important lessons I try to impart is that they should be clear about when and

Don’t expect the other side to pay your attorney’s fees

Posted Friday, April 14th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Attorney's Fees, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

Folks going through marital litigation–and, less often, folks going through custody disputes– often contact me regarding representation with the expectation that the other side will

The best time to defeat a relocation case is before it’s filed

Posted Saturday, April 8th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Child Custody, Litigation Strategy, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

In my 20+ years of family law practice, I’ve yet to see a relocation case in which the requested relocation was solely for the child’s

The price of relocation

Posted Friday, April 7th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Child Custody, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

When custodial parents relocate, the non-custodial parent almost always suffers. Typically they lose the frequent contact with the minor child that helps sustain most parent-child

You don’t have to pretend to be perfect

Posted Thursday, March 30th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Litigation Strategy, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

A lot of family court litigants harm their cases because they don’t want to admit anything that makes them look bad. Confronted with such behavior

If you want peace, prepare for war

Posted Sunday, March 19th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Litigation Strategy, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

Clients often ask me, if the goal is to settle the case, why I ask them to gather substantial information or why I issue discovery

Representing witnesses of current family court clients

Posted Sunday, March 5th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, Rules of Professional (Lawyer) Conduct

A few times every year a witness in a current family court case will ask me to represent him or her in a family court

Let’s Make Better Mistakes Tomorrow

Posted Friday, January 6th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants

Recently, walking past an apartment in Amsterdam, I observed the following postcard-sized calling card for a “life coach” and broke out laughing: Attorneys, especially family law

Is empathy really useful for a family law attorney?

Posted Thursday, January 5th, 2017 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Attorney-Client Relations, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

A recent New York Times ROOM for DEBATE discussed Does Empathy Guide or Hinder Moral Action? The anti-empathy debater defined it as “the capacity to

Put Mr. Forman’s experience, knowledge, and dedication to your service for any of your South Carolina family law needs.