Whose signatures are needed for family court consent orders?

Posted Thursday, November 3rd, 2022 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Family Court Procedure, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Specific

In the pre-COVID days, one could typically get temporary orders approved with just the attorneys’ signatures and could almost always get procedural orders approved with

Pro se appellant creates interesting law on military retirement and jurisdictional challenges

Posted Thursday, May 26th, 2022 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Equitable Distribution/Property Division, Family Court Procedure, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Appellate Decisions, South Carolina Specific

The May 25, 2022, Court of Appeals opinion in the case of Williams v. Williams, 436 S.C. 550, 873 S.E.2d 785 (Ct.App. 2022), demonstrates the

The vital distinction between dismissal with prejudice and dismissal without prejudice

Posted Saturday, April 2nd, 2022 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Family Court Procedure, Litigation Strategy, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

In family court there is a vital distinction between dismissal with prejudice and dismissal without prejudice. “A dismissal of a case without prejudice means that

Why not have multiple final orders?

Posted Thursday, March 31st, 2022 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Family Court Procedure, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys

When a case concludes, family law attorneys typically draft one final order addressing all issues in the case. It is certainly the easiest method of

Surprising few, Supreme Court holds that child issues cannot be arbitrated

Posted Friday, September 10th, 2021 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Family Court Procedure, Mediation/Alternative Dispute Resolution, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Appellate Decisions, South Carolina Specific

In Fall 2019, the South Carolina Court of Appeals issued two separate opinions holding that child issues could not be arbitrated: Kosciusko v. Parham, 428

Court of Appeals opinion unwittingly exposes serious flaws in South Carolina’s Family Court Rules

Posted Monday, July 26th, 2021 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Child Custody, Contempt/Enforcement of Orders, Family Court Procedure, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Appellate Decisions, South Carolina Specific

The July 7, 2021, Court of Appeals opinion in Taylor v. Taylor, 863 S.E.2d 335, 434 S.C. 307 (2021), unwittingly exposes serious flaws in South

Does the ten-day notice requirement in South Carolina Family Court Rule 14(d) violate procedural due process?

Posted Thursday, July 8th, 2021 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Contempt/Enforcement of Orders, Family Court Procedure, Jurisprudence, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Specific

I have little doubt that, if raised in the proper case, the ten-day notice requirement in South Carolina Family Court Rule 14(d) will be held

Refiled Sellers opinion adds one footnote and one clarification

Posted Wednesday, December 9th, 2020 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Child Custody, Family Court Procedure, Of Interest to Family Law Attorneys, South Carolina Appellate Decisions, South Carolina Specific

A refiled December 9, 2020 Court of Appeals opinion in Sellers v. Nicholls, 432 S.C. 101, 851 S.E.2d 54 (Ct. App. 2020), makes two minor

Litigating by day; fornicating by night

Posted Monday, November 2nd, 2020 by Gregory Forman
Filed under Family Court Procedure, Not South Carolina Specific, Of Interest to Family Court Litigants

Early in my career there was a long-ago-retired, rural-county judge who admonished litigants violating the following rule that, “ya cain’t be LIT-I-GATE-in’ in the daytime

Put Mr. Forman’s experience, knowledge, and dedication to your service for any of your South Carolina family law needs.